This session has been completed.

Understanding Neuroplasticity for Better Learning and Teaching Series: (3 of 6) Why and How to Train Memory Recovery and Explanation Development?

Registration Closed
Facilitator(s): Steve Masson
Date:October 15, 2020
Time:4:00 pm – 5:00 pm MDT
Cost:
$20.00 (CAD)
Location: Virtual
Type:
Webinar
Course code: 21-FR-080

Target Audience

Education workers in francophone and immersion schools in Alberta

About this learning opportunity

Please note that this training is reserved for education workers from francophone and immersion schools in Alberta and that the webinar will not be recorded.

Please use your work email to register.


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Webinar 3: Why and How to Train Garbage Collection and Explanation Development?

Among all the possible educational activities, there are two that stand out from the others in terms of their effectiveness. It has in fact been shown in more than a hundred studies that training in memory retrieval and the development of explanations can significantly promote student learning. Why do these two types of activities promote learning so much? What is the link between this remarkable efficiency and the functioning of the brain? In this presentation, we will answer these questions in addition to proposing strategies to more easily and more effectively integrate memory retrieval training and the development of explanations into its teaching.

 

November 12: Why and how to space out the learning activities?

November 26: Why and how to maximize feedback?

December 10: Why and how to cultivate a dynamic state of mind?

 

About the facilitator(s)

After teaching elementary and high school for five years, Steve Masson completed one of the first doctoral theses in education presenting functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Since 2012, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Education at the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM) and director of the Neuroeducational Research Laboratory (LRN). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, he studies the brain mechanisms linked to school learning and teaching. He is particularly interested in the effects of teaching practices on the brain and the role of neuroscience in the choice of effective teaching strategies.

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